Archive for the ‘Sensemaker’ Category

Predictable & resilient programs

15 November, 2013

Too many efforts get lost in complexity or frustration.

“I wish we had known before, what we know now; we never would have started this project”

“Why don’t they listen to us?” asked the project manager himself about management

Many programs keep their focus regardless changes in the system around them

We live in a world that is dynamic and always in motion. That’s a fact. So, how can we know today, what will be the challenge of tomorrow? The answer is simple: we do not know, unless…

Starting a program is to achieve some goal that was defined yesterday. How do you manage a program that aims to achieve something that may or may not be changed while you do your utmost best to get there? How can you early recognize a changing goal that you targeted?

Organizations need to be able to apply a kind of rocket that is guided to it’s moving target by means of laser. Listen2Change offers this management guidance. We provide the laser beam that the decision maker transfers into an adjusted focus, based on new knowledge of the target and the system.

A program in a system influences the system and is impacted by unpredictable agents in that system and events outside that system.

We visualize the influences and resulting changes on regular basis (daily, weekly, ..). It enables weak signal detection to identify risks or opportunities.

For this we use short anecdotes from all stakeholders in the system. Each anacdote-teller adds predefined ‘tags’ or signifying data to their anecdote. The signification provides navigation through the hundreds of anecdotes. it unleashes understanding detailed changes and impact from the perspective of each participant.

The underlying assumption is that people exchange information via stories. The stories are triggered by open questions and gathered independent from each other.  The complete set of stories provide a true reflection of the  reality. As it is continuous it truly provides your laser beam towards a moving target.

The method provides any program or mission the means to start without a clear understanding of the final result. This result will emerge from the running program and its impact in the system.

 

Human Sensor Networks

13 March, 2013

Michael Cheveldave from Cognitive Edge wrote a blog on human sensor networks. It is excellent reading material. This blog contains the highlights of Michael’s explanation, with references to Agile IT development and DevOps.

By changing human sensor networks into customer sensor networks, I merely focus on the application of CSN in IT Agile development life cycles. You may easily argue to keep human sensor networks, as also own employees or other relevant stakeholders provide feedback using the CSN system.

Michael explains the role SenseMaker® plays in delivering organizations the value of human sensor networks.

… by engaging a large number of people in the process of making sense of their everyday experiences and observations, and allowing meaning to be effectively layered on such experiences we stimulate a network of agents in the systems to make sense of the system themselves.

By integrating different customer groups in functionality definition we will

  • easier and sooner understand real customer needs
  • build a fruitful relationship with the customer-base
  • create pro-active sponsors at the customers of the product
  • enable the customer-base to better understand their needs, and innovative possibilities that the organization can provide
  • better understand which private betas to be tested by which user group type
  • better understand collected quantitative data by means of this qualitative data

… think about how traditional approaches often emphasise the value of external experts or selectively privilege a small team within the company on such strategic decisions.

The decision making process which functionality to build and release

  • focusses more quickly to that functionality actually needed by customers
  • enables, together with feature flags, different features to be released to different customers types (based on their needs)

Sales and marketing collect valuable information on their targeted customer groups. Information is achieved cheaper, faster and more reliable then based on traditional marketing research.

The approach (a human sensor network AK) allows for the executive team to tap into the distributed cognition, intelligence, scanning, and knowledge of a broader network in a way that effectively informs key strategic decisions.

Reading experiences, ideas and frustrations from actual users, exposes product management, marketing managers and developers to the impact of their initial ideas on what functionality is needed. When well guided, the team will quickly and easily understand existing patterns and needs. Future releases are more effective and efficient.

The ultimate result is a learning organization. People from different organizational silo’s co-interpret and co-decide based on both trends and contextual information. This leads to an organizational wide understanding of and believe in the business goals and opportunities.

Customer Sensor Networks

12 March, 2013

Agile software development has 2 major positive attributes: the short release cycle and the possibility to integrate release-feedback rapidly in the product backlog. In this blog Customer Sensor Networks (CSN) are explained as a mechanism to integrate the Agile software development life cycle with customer feedback effectively.

CSN enables insight in what functionally is needed or wanted. To understand customer needs can be a challenge. In many cases customers do not have any idea what is possible in terms of functionality.

What is possible is in the heads of the developers, architects., analysts or product managers. But what is technically possible is not always wanted or needed by the customers.

The short feedback loop with a short time to market, enables product management to ‘test’ how features are accepted by (parts of) the customer-base. Implementing CSN lets the organization understand effort- and cost-effectively what functionality customers are willing to pay for. It is a good idea to involve the marketing strategy in the development life cycle.

Which customers to select is based on their expertise or area of interest. A variety of customer-types increases the variety of feedback. Innovators will appreciate other aspects then customers in the early or late majority groups. Which profiles you select, will be based on the business and business objectives.

Customer Sensor Network

Figure 1: Customer Sensor Network implementation.

The CSN explained here is based on Sense Maker® software of Cognitive Edge.

The CSN uses an online collector website which pre-processed the information for the product owner and the DevOps teams. Pre-processing is done by the CSN and based on the information provided by the customers.

The Feedback analysis consists of functional evaluation and an emotional aspect. The functional aspects cover things like how features are used or what is missing. The emotional aspect lets product owner en DevOps team members understand what (missing) functionality does with customers. The emotional evaluation is important to understand and support marketing aspects of the product.

Techniques like private beta’s or feature flags enable teams to manipulate releases to different test- or customer groups.

Figure 1 also shows typical takt times in a CSN system. Takt time and wait time lets the DevOps team and product owner optimize flow and adjust overall throughput time with the expectations of the different test groups. This example shows a sprint of 3 weeks. The test period is set for 1 week. Then the feedback is evaluated 2 weeks after the DevOps team finished work. Depending on the expectations of the customer test groups, the waiting time for the customer groups to learn what the effect of their testing has been, might be too long.

Using customers in the development life cycle presents some challenges to the organization. Aspects to take into consideration are incentives and how they (in)formally integrate in the communication plans. Incentives may differ per customer type. For example, for innovator’s their name can be listed on the product website as contributors, or they are invited on some regular basis to the development site to discuss with the DevOps teams and product owners. The early and late majority groups can be given a free license of the product.

CSN provides an effective organizational and team learning mechanism. New idea’s can be tested rapidly and (cost-)effectively. CSN triggers a business approach to Agile development. Developers, maintenance people, product management and marketing all learn as a team what it is that makes their customers happy or dissatisfied.

Applying customer sensor networks (CSN) in Lean Startup and DevOps teams

7 March, 2013

The Lean Startup movement addresses the issue to match product functionality to market demand. For this a contextual external customer feedback loop needs to be implemented. A customer sensor network using SenseMaker® provides online, real-time and continuous contextual feedback, closing the feedback loop.

SenseMaker uses an online collector website that lets customers provide feedback by means of narratives. Each narrative gets a title. The customers also provide additional meaning to their narrative. The system categorizes feedback based on the meaning given by the customers. This avoids overhead during analysis for the organization. The SenseMaker analysis software supports the evaluation of the feedback. Enabling effective and short evaluation time. This feedback mechanism enables evaluation of large amounts of feedback from different customer or user groups.

The analysis software provides both quantitative and qualitative evaluation. The quantitative aspects provide insight if functionality acceptance level. The qualitative aspects provide deeper insight in innovation opportunities. For example alternative or unforeseen use of the functionality. On the other side of the same scale, the feedback points to a risk or threat. For example that the new functionality is not well accepted by early innovators.

Customer sensor networks integrate with Lean Startup pilot experiments and DevOps private beta’s. It also provides for DevOps implementation the needed internal and external feedback for development. The internal feedback from operations to development is useful in case when the DevOps consists of multiple team in different locations.

CSN makes it possible that for some types of development, product management joins DevOps teams to form ProDevOps. This really reduces overhead and transition costs. It enables a whole new approach to app development in a true Agile manner.

 

SenseMaker is a Cognitive Edge product linking micro-narratives with human sense-making to create advanced decision support, research and monitoring capability in both large and small organisations.

 

Applying SenseMaker® in scrum projects

2 July, 2012

In earlier blogs I showed how SenseMaking software ecology and the Cynefin model support Agile development. In this blog I’ll explain how to SenseMaker® supports gathering large amounts of user stories or feedback. These stories are input for the product back log and the product vision.

SenseMaker® enables software developing organizations to involve large groups of users or customers in both the requirements gathering phase and the maintenance phase. This gives them an advantage over their competitors. The input and feedback ensure that the new functions are adequate and fulfill a concrete demand.

Story tellers enter their stories on website. After entering their stories they are asked to provide additional meaning to their stories. This provides for valuable additional information. This is called signification and forms the core of the requirements gathering process. The signification framework is tailor-made. It structures the hundreds or thousands of stories in such a way that the development team is able to analyze them effectively.

In a next step the development team(s) analyze the entered stories. During the analysis the team transfers the raw user stories into a product back log. The backlog reflects the concrete demand of the users and customers. As the categorization incorporates a prioritization the development teams knows which functionality is to transferred to the sprint team first.

Emerging functionality
Once the sprint teams deliver their first functionality to the users, SenseMaker enable real-time feedback. This mechanism allows end-users to evaluate and try out new functionality and provide instant feedback. Because of the automated and real-time feedback mechanism the development is able to deliver only functionality for which is a real demand. It is also possible to try out new stuff end-users have not seen before.

The above described mechanisms provides a great advantage for the organization. First it doesn’t waste valuable development capacity on irrelevant functionality. Second, both first–end-users and developers feel appreciated as their ideas and thoughts are directly used. Thirdly because the organization is able to produce new functionality in a lean and flexible manner, the organization gains the recognition being innovative and customer-centric.

How SenseMaking creates learning organizations by effective change programs.

8 June, 2012

The natural approach for effective change programs is full involvement of and guidance by all involved key-players. Combined with a natural learning approach this leads to effective continuous change programs and a learning organization.

What is different related to old-fashioned centrally and top-down managed change or improvement programs is the emerge of the outcome during execution of the change program. Based on the learning path, new nearby objectives are defined.

Sensemaking creates learning organizations in just 6 steps.

1    Entry criteria
Use the 6 steps only if your problem belongs to the complex domain. Obvious and complicated problems are bests solved by using standard solving techniques. See the Cynefin model for background information on the different problem domains.

2    SenseMaker design
SenseMaker® facilitates continuous, small and large scale, fine-tuned listening to all stakeholders (clients, employees, external (non-)experts). The design of SenseMaker is essential for a successful change or improvement program. A correct design ensures that the right information is distilled. An incorrect design provides not the information that the next steps need in order to be effective. It leads to frustrated stakeholders as their voice, thoughts and ideas are not heard or implemented.

3    Initial workshop
The initial workshop both validates the SenseMaker design and generates a vision of possible solutions. These possible solutions provide the first steps towards learning. Typically a Cognitive Edge method like Future Backwards is used to facilitate the workshop.

4    Experiment definition
The outcome of the initial workshop is used to define a first set of low-key-low -profile experiments. The costs and duration of each experiment is kept to a minimum. None of the experiments is expected to provide an ultimate solution to the problem.

Each experiment is described in the form of actions and indicators for feedback-signals that indicate positive or negative change. By generating additional context information, management is able to understand early (weak) signals. In this way initial actions that show promise are extended while negative indicators trigger recovery actions and choose of alternatives approaches.

5    Learning by experimentation
The initial experiments provide learning opportunities. Learning is generated both from the experiments participants and by the feedback loop continuous and real-time generated by all stakeholders using SenseMaker.

6    Emerging change
Outcome of each experiment is evaluated both by means of it’s direct outcome or delivery and by means of the feedback mechanism. Those experiments that both deliver on outcome and receives good feedback are re-evaluated for strengthening and to be continued. Those experiments that fail to deliver are stopped. Notice that learning may trigger new experiments.

Step 5 and 6 is a continuous loop. New problems or emerging insights will most likely trigger new experiments. A learning organization is created.

The above figure below shows a graphical view on experimentation in a learning organization. In the emerging process of learning, more and more practical knowledge is generated. This enables more stable experiments. By reducing the risks of failing experiments, the size (€) and duration (T).

Sensemaking based employee satisfaction surveys for happy employees

7 June, 2012

Sensemaking based surveys supports organizations that wants to engage all their employees in strategic and tactical decision making, innovation and knowledge generator.
We at TOP innosense make this promise a guarantee.

Everybody knows those standard surveys which state for example that the satisfaction rose from 6.7 last year to 6.8 this year. Everybody a bonus! But what these types of old fashioned surveys lack, is the actual engagement of all staff in the overall and daily strategic and tactical decision making, innovation and knowledge generator if the company. What a waste!

How to accomplish this? Simple by using the Cynefin framework and the supporting Sensemaking® software.

Managing an organization or any sized group of people is a complex task. There are too many stakeholders, events or other types of modulators that interact continuously and unpredictable. Any change can only be explained on hindsight. So starting with a predefined plan on any level (strategic or tactical) is doomed to fail.

Sensemaking lets the organization continuous listening to the (coffee machine) anecdotes or micro-stories. It enables all employees to enter their thoughts and ideas. The gathering is either written or spoken text, a picture or a photo. The anecdotes are provided additional meaning by the original authors. When also external stakeholders are invited to enter their thoughts, ideas and opinions in the Sensemaking database, the organization has an in depth knowledge on what is at stake below the surface,

Cynefin shows how to addressed and manage complex problems. Experiments supports learning and identifying in which direction the company and it’s strategy flows. Because of the agile approach, the company is continuously and fluently able to manoeuvre effectively.

Anyone in the organization is able to see the stories entered (continuous monitoring). Because the process is real time, your story is read and used tomorrow. This enables quick adaption of decisions directly after decisions have been made. This in turn enables adjusting decisions early in the process, when the cost or repair is still low, or the impact still limited.

What of all the above is the result on the morale of the employees? I guess you know 😉

Cynefin-agile requirements development using SenseMaker®

6 June, 2012

In a previous blog I wrote on Lean and Agile software development with Sensemaker.
In this blog I’ll further explore the actual use of Sensemaker for initial development of requirements for software projects. I also explain the process of distilling high level requirements into detailed user stories.

In standard fail-safe software development environment, requirements development is a steps-wise process from high level business- or user requests into smart allocated product component requirements.  This is a process which intertwines with constructing a Work Breakdown Structure. This breaking down enables the project to determine a high level overview on the work to be done. It is the vision of what the end product is about, without yet knowing the functionality in detail.

At this point the project decides on the approach to develop the functionality (e.g. scrum, waterfall, etc.) and how this is delivered to the customer. Typically if the environment is both complex in terms of number of requirements, the number of stakeholders involved and the frequency that requirements change, a Cynefin-agile approach is recommended.
If the set of requirements is limited and clear from the outset, just use the waterfall method or, if you can’t resists, apply agile-scrum.

In order to apply the cynefin-agile approach the use of signifying large quantities of requirements in SenseMaker is recommended. Using SenseMaker involves signifying the requirements or user-stories. Signifying can be done by the providers of the user stories, or by SenseMaker. It reduces the overhead of handling large amount of stakeholder input significantly.

Signifying provides a structure that enables the development team to view large amount of entered stories from different viewpoints. (during maintenance of the delivered product this method provides strong innovation opportunities).
Analyzing the signified set of requirements/user stories provides the product backlog.

Another element of cynefin-agile are the so-called experiments. In early stages of new development, neither the stakeholders, nor the development team have a clear picture of what is to build. So in stead of the standard fail-safe approach an Safe-Fail approach is opted.

Safe-fail provides an development environment based on learning. Only by learning the development team and other stakeholders are able to gain an understanding of the capabilities and opportunities to be developed. Experiments are started on some selected user stories from the product backlog. Mark that failures of some experiments are expected! This failure provides the must needed learning. Learning provides valuable insight in the risks and innovation possibilities.

The functionality delivered after each sprint or increment is evaluated by the team and stakeholders. Experiments are either stopped or enforced. In such way, all parts of the vision can be addressed.
The delivered functionality is co-created by the development team and all stakeholders.

Using Sensemaker® enables development teams to apply the cynefin-agile approach of safe-fail software or product development.

Out-focussed (domain-novice) facilitation in Sensemaking projects for better results

31 May, 2012

Last week I participated in a very interactive and useful workshop on Sensemaker®. Sensemaker provides a platform to gather, process, and visualize knowledge. Part of the discussions in smaller groups went on the application of Sensemaker. One of the discussed aspects was the possible result of Sensemaking projects in the context of the customer. In this blog I’ll defend a bold statement: “the ‘novice-domain’ or ‘out-focused’ facilitator is more likely to provide surprising or unexpected results then the field-expert of in-focused.”

Underlying to this statement is the pure uniqueness of Sensemaking projects. It enables large-scale fine-tuned listening to an unlimited number of people. It provides decision makers, innovation seekers and researchers in general, a method to distill hidden or weak information/knowledge. This is based on the Cynefin framework and the Sensemaker Ecology, Also check Dave Snowden’s blogs.

Before going into details some explanation. In 2006 I learned out-focussed coaching in personal and team potential exploration programs. Out-focussed means that as coach (or facilitator) you do not need to understand the underlying problem being discussed. As coach you focus on the convictions of the coachee.

An example: Let’s say I coach Peter. Peter’s question is his effectiveness in his team. In the coaching session he recalls a difficult situation in his team. In stead of asking him to explain the situation (to understand what happened) I ask him what he wanted to get out of the situation, what prevented him to achieve this and what he can do different next time. As Peter doesn’t need to explain the situation (which he already knows), we save time and address the problem at hand directly. 
At the end of the session Peter leaves with a better understanding on his own actions and convictions. The result would have been much less if I coached in-focussed. Asking questions on the situation; what his history was with the team; explaining similar situations I had been; etc.

My statement is that out-focussed (of novice-domain experts) facilitators, are able to generate more surprising knowledge and results on the subject then domain experts who integrate their expertise during the whole project. Of course the out-focused facilitator needs to be an experienced and knowledgeable (big) group facilitator. He also is an Cynefin and Sensemaking expert.

During Sensemaking workshops and in the configuration of the Sensemaker tool, an out-focused facilitator is able to extract and use more and more unexpected information from the participants. By being out-focused the facilitator is also not tempted to steer the outcome of the evaluate the (intermediate) results himself. The latter is described as being in-focused.   
Out-focused Sensemaking expert enables knowledge, insights, answers and innovation ideas to emerge. Any intervention (a word, a proposal, a gesture) from the facilitator, is a risk that this unexpected emergence of knowledge is subdued.

For the same reason, using internal Sensemaking experts is not advisable as the risk is even bigger. Unless of course the facilitator is not an domain-expert and is free from internal (political) strings.