Flow in an Agile environment.

Flow is the new buzz. Each of us knows exactly what flow is. And how it feels. It feels great! You probably have even experienced it yourself. Great! But flow in relation with work?  That is something else. It needs planning,  and changing work habits.

In my previous blog I started with the above paragraph. It triggered questions on what Flow is? Trying to answer this question took too many words for a small reply. So I made a blog in which I describe what I mean with Flow.

Being in “the Flow” means that what I do in that moment of Flow goes ”effortless”, “smoothly” and in a continuous cadence.

When I talk about Flow in a team setting, there are two views:

  • The team is in a mood in which it “effortless” and “smoothly” produces results;
  • The work items run smoothly from left (input queue or Product backlog) to the right (output queue). There are no inventories that block the flow of work, and work does not flow backwards (upwards).

The view on work that flows upstream makes people realize the unnatural aspect of it. Work, like water, always flows downstream. If not, then the (natural) flow is ‘broken’ and waste is created: “effort to bring the water of work upstream”.

So flow in our work environment is the continuous movement of work items in the direction of the customer. Never moving away from the customer. In each step value is added to the work items. We only add value that makes the customer happy. If not we pollute the water, add baggage to the work items that makes the customer not happy, the maintenance more difficult and the change of defects greater.

Flow as well means that the effort for the workers is evenly distributed and not ‘batch-like’. The work steps are in balance. No step is overloaded and no step is starving.

Flow in a kanban system aims to reduce work staying in inventories, as this creates waterfalls. With a real danger of dam busts.

Inventory typically occurs when we hit a bottleneck or constraint. Opposite it means that we avoid waterfalls and inventory by taking away constraints.

the team becomes more stable and predictable in their  deliveries.

So, from whatever view you look at Flow, it is a powerful weapon making your team more fun and more resultful.

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One Response to “Flow in an Agile environment.”

  1. ronnydw Says:

    I like this article. Working as an analist in an agile software development team I see it as my main role to enable flow for the developers, analyse and collect information just in time (not creating inventory) for the developers, as such leveraging the efficiency and effectivity for development to create customer value as smoothly as possible. Analist is not an official scrum role (product owner comes closest) but leaving these activities to developers often leads to bottlenecks and inconsistencies slowing down and reducing velocity.

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